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Fishes of the Gulf of Maine
By Henry B. Bigelow and William C. Schroeder
Gulf of Maine Research Institute

The Fishes of the Gulf of Maine by Bigelow and Schroeder, is sourced and excerpted from a project done by the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI).

The GMRI writes about the author and this seminal work in Marine Science:

QUOTE
Henry Bryant Bigelow's noteworthy career as an oceanographer began in the first decade of the Twentieth Century under the tutelage of the legendary Alexander Agassiz, director of Harvard University's Museum of Comparative Zoology.

In an article for Harvard Magazine, David Dobbs, author of The Great Gulf, a thorough and balanced treatment of the current state of Gulf of Maine fisheries, notes that Bigelow "sailed tens of thousands of miles, spent hundreds of nights at sea, made more than 10,000 net hauls to sample sea life, and released more than 1,000 drift bottles containing notes asking the finder to mail him the location of discovery."

Equally important, Bigelow believed that fishermen held important knowledge about fish locations and habits, and that a collaborative relationship between fishermen and scientists offered important long-term benefits in understanding the fishery resource in the Gulf of Maine. That conviction is borne out today with a robust program of collaborative fishery research that places scientists on fishing vessels to acquire knowledge about the current state of fisheries.

Fishes of the Gulf of Maine was originally published in 1925 with William Welsh, a Bureau of Fisheries scientist who often accompanied Bigelow on his research cruises.

In the late 1920's, Bigelow began a long association with William C. Schroeder, publishing a number of papers and reports on fishes of the North Atlantic, including the first revision of Fishes of the Gulf of Maine, published in 1953. It is that 1953 edition that is reproduced here.

Bigelow also wrote a seminal report that contributed to the funding and launch of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he served as Director. Both a laboratory building at Woods Hole and the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in West Boothbay Harbor, Maine, bear his name today. END QUOTE

The Gulf of Maine Research Institute brings scientists, fishermen, and other marine stakeholders together as equal partners in marine ecosystem research stretching from Nova Scotia to Cape Cod and offshore 120 miles to Georges Bank. These projects involve more than 60 different fishing vessels and 45 scientists from 12 research institutions and are already contributing to more effective fishery management.

GMRI is a leader in cutting-edge scientific research in marine biotechnology, a new science that transforms products from the ocean into new food, drugs, chemicals and other products. GMRI's work has already yielded mussel-based bioadhesives, brittlestar-inspired fiberoptics, and high-tech aquaculture innovations. Marine nanotechnology research on the biomineralization process in oysters and algae underway by the NASA funded Maine Biological Nanotechnology Effort has the potential to produce new medical treatments for bone loss in astronauts and self-healing surface materials for space vehicles.

In our opinion the Gulf of Maine Research Institute will not only play a central role in defining a dynamic model for a 21st century maritime economy but is also a trusted and most worthy institution for your financial support.

The complete Fishes of the Gulf of Maine is online at http://www.gmri.org/


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Douglas McKay, Secretary

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, John L. Farley, Director

Fishes of the Gulf of Maine

By Henry B. Bigelow and William C. Schroeder

FISHERY BULLETIN 74

FISHERY BULLETIN OF THE FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

Volume 53

[Contribution No. 592, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution]

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE - Washington: 1953


Bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix (Linnaeus) 1758

Striped Bass Roccus saxatilis (Walbaum) 1792

Summer flounder (fluke) Paralichthys dentatus (Linnaeus) 1766

Weakfish Cynoscion regalis (Bloch and Schneider) 1801

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