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Ask Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is recognized as an authority on surf fishing for striped bass. He is the author of six books and hundreds of magazine articles. Frank is a member of the Outdoor Writers of America and lectures throughout the Northeast.

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  #16  
Old 11-27-2017, 03:06 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

The video calls the Striped Bass a "southern species" that "warming seas" lure to northern waters.

I never considered a striped bass a "southern species" (I'm not "complaining" just that this is a new "reference" for me)

One problem I see in the video is the mixing of the Eastern and Western Atlantic "stories"... I mean (and I'm only *partially* through the video), there are no striped bass over in Europe, right?
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  #17  
Old 11-28-2017, 01:16 PM
Francis Daignault Francis Daignault is online now
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

Their Europe salmon are being reduced in the North Atlantic at an alarming rate. The salmon's problem is multifaceted. The high seas fishery is taking from European salmon as well as North American. The southern species to which they are referring are likely St Croix natural stripers along with Maine rivers fish and no doubt some from Chesepeake and Delaware R. No one knows which race of stripers is causing all the predation on the salmon smolt dropping down for their first sea swaray. All they know is that salmon natal rivers are loaded with stripers. Maine coast is XXX deep in stripers. Our daughter, Susan, who lives in Maine, catches all the stripers she wants. Most Mainers don't know it but the striper fishing is very good.

Maybe not you or me, but worldwide the Atlantic salmon is a much more important fish than those course, trashy stripers.
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  #18  
Old 11-29-2017, 07:02 AM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

I always knew salmon to be royalty across the pond, it did a great job showing the research into migration patterns... I vaguely remember about the Greenland connection but this video is outstanding. Amazing the amount of research going into this fish.
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  #19  
Old 11-29-2017, 02:04 PM
Francis Daignault Francis Daignault is online now
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Salmon are treated as a commodity. The U.S. is the only place where you are not sold salmon fishing and there is little to no salmon fishing here. Consequently, you pay for salmon fishing elsewhere. The price is whatever the traffic will bare. Lower where there are few salmon. In Iceland, where the salmon rivers are the most productive on earth, last I heard it was $15,000 per rod week. Leave your wife at home. In Casupscal , Quebec, the crappy part of the Matapedia cost in the 1980s when I was there was $25/day. I fished for a week and never got a rise. I did see a 46 pound salmon being weighed at the Ministry where they sell you day tickets, which was taken from a more expensive parts of the river. Money buys good water which yields good fishing. That is about as large an Atlantic as you will probably ever see. In broken English the Frenchman who had it admitted that was the biggest salmon he ever saw. Almost humorous that my striper fishing earnings were funding my salmon fishing.

Of course if you are a cheapskate you can pay more for better fishing. Good rivers with prime sections are privately owned and no money can buy you in. The late Ted Williams owned a good section of the Miramachi. Sneak in and someone will shoot you.
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Old 12-13-2017, 02:34 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

It will be interesting to see what the Maritime governments do to control the striper population in light of the widespread belief that the bass are prediting upon the Atlantic salmon. This is bound to bring controversy to fisheries management.
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  #21  
Old 12-14-2017, 06:41 AM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

Interesting new concept in "border wars".... US trying to boost the striper population and Canada trying to wipe them out.

Are the stripers up there "resident" or "migratory"... any clue?
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  #22  
Old 12-14-2017, 02:49 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

My understanding is that stripers in Canada are both migratory and resident.
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Old 12-14-2017, 03:13 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin Boat View Post
My understanding is that stripers in Canada are both migratory and resident.
Yes, that is my understanding as well. Both striper sources can be bred but determination of what source dominates could be determined through DNA analysis. I think Maritimes stripers flourished because of low commercial harvest where emphasis, in the past, has been on salmon. U.S. stripers, on the other hand, have been hammered commercially. I know that Maine stripers, way north or at least mid-state north, are at huge levels. Our daughter, who guides some, teaches fly fishing some, and works for an outdoor house part-time, says there are more and more stripers where she fishes, around the mouth of the Kennebec and north. Once you get to Maine traditions don't acknowledge striper fishing and certainly night fishing, what they call fishing with the owls, is not carried on. So Mainers don't have a feel for the striper fishery growth. The only reason they see stripers in the Maritimes is because they catch them while salmon fishing. If they cut a striper, they find salmon smolt in bass bellies.
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  #24  
Old 12-16-2017, 12:06 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

Quote from Lyman and Woolner's STRIPED BASS FISHING:
"North and east of Maine, Canadian stripers do not wander widely, although in years when bass are unusually abundant to the south, their numbers are augmented by migrators from from the northern United States. Like the riverine fish of the Gulf of Mexico, the bass of the Saint Lawrence watershed make short journeys up and down the river system, yet rarely leave the Gulf of Saint Lawrence itself. Similar local populations were found in many river systems of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Quebec. After spawning, these Canadian stocks in general move almost exactly opposite to their United States cousins - that is, they swim south in the summer and north as waters cool in autumn."
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Old 12-16-2017, 02:27 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

Like you, I have every regard for both Lyman and Woolner but I think much more is known today about the evolved presence of Canada stripers. For instance, today we are told that St Lawrence stripers are all but extinct while Maritime bass are at explosive levels. Very little is known about Canada bass -- local, US or mixed? No research is carried on because stripers lack status in the sport fishing world. I am not speaking for myself; rather, it is my perception of Canadian fisheries concerns. And I concede that I could be wrong.
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  #26  
Old 12-16-2017, 04:10 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

I'd
















I think there is a need and a market for current research on this subject. I would love to know more.
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  #27  
Old 12-17-2017, 06:15 AM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

It would be in Canadian fisheries manager's best interest to understand how the two species interact, not just locally, in order to best understand how to manage their precious salmon, no? The question has been raised, so they should team up with their friends south of the border. Agree with Tin Boat about the need and market for current research on the subject!
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  #28  
Old 12-17-2017, 11:47 AM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

What a great research project for an outdoor writer!
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  #29  
Old 12-18-2017, 02:16 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin Boat View Post
What a great research project for an outdoor writer!
Not me! Not only that I don't want it but years ago I was asked to draft a proposal for the Chaffee Striped Bass law for the Fish and Wildlife Service. I put in a lot of
work drafting a proposal. Their response was that they liked my proposal and that it was well within their needs and parameters. But the committee in charge decided to go about their Public Access differently. That is but one reason why I am repulsed by the Government. Who pays for my efforts which fell victim to their change of mind?

Even here in the states, where there is plenty of interest in striper management, there has never been a fresh study of the breakdown of striper sources between Hudson and Chesepeake strains. Further complicating it is the addition of Delaware River fish, which have recently begun to contribute to the overall fishery. I don't think Canada wants us screwing around their fish in their waters to determine rivers-of-origin.
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  #30  
Old 12-18-2017, 08:56 PM
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Default Re: This was a Shock!

Agreed that there needs to be a study of river-of-origin for the millions of small stripers that have been all over the northeast coast for the past couple of years. Not only where they come from, but also where they spend the winter. I have read that they are primarily Hudson River fish, and if so, we owe a debt of gratitude to iconic folk musician Pete Seeger. He spearheaded the cleanup of the river with his Clearwater schooner all those years ago.
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