Home
 
     HOME     ARTICLES     Frank DAIGNAULT     TROPHY RIGS     CONTENTS     FAQs     FLY FISHING     OFF ROAD 4 X 4     STRIPED BASS    SURFCASTING
 
Click for Daignault Biography Twenty Years Trophy Striper Striper Surf Striper Hot Spots MID-ATLANTIC Striper Hot Spots - NEW ENGLAND Eastern Tides Fly Fishing the Striper Surf
TWENTY YEARS ON THE CAPE - STRIPER SURF - STRIPER HOT SPOTS - THE TROPHY STRIPER
EASTERN TIDES - FLY FISHING THE STRIPER SURF
Welcome to Frank Daignault's "CASTS" - Center for Advanced Studies of Trophy Stripers.
Please be sure to read the Protocol and then join in!
 
 
Go Back   StriperSurf Forums > Main Forums > Ask Frank Daignault

Ask Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is recognized as an authority on surf fishing for striped bass. He is the author of six books and hundreds of magazine articles. Frank is a member of the Outdoor Writers of America and lectures throughout the Northeast.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 01-24-2012, 02:10 PM
ragman's Avatar
ragman ragman is offline
Moderator,Team SS 04-08
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
Posts: 16,237
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

As many know here, when it comes to bait, I use surf clams. I see these guys (and my son is one of them) using them with all the guts and stuff wrapped around the hook, makes for a big presentation. I only use the meaty part myself, covers the hook and nice presentation. I have caught good sized stripers with my way, while my son got smaller. I think it's more of whats put in front of them that gets them to take, rather than size... I dunno...
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 01-24-2012, 05:31 PM
MAD 6's Avatar
MAD 6 MAD 6 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 909
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

Berkley has those Alive! version of greencrabs, suprised they haven't made their version of fluke scented/flavored fluke rubber.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 01-25-2012, 04:02 PM
Frank Daignault's Avatar
Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
Writer, Hunter, Surfcaster
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 30,458
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

Surfcasting its really tough to use a whole big bait. Who is going to cast a four pound shad? But in boats I have seen three to five pound pollock, shad, mackerel or bunker live lined over the side to catch moby stripers. The logistics in shore fishing just don't lend themselves to that kind of big bait fishing. Eels are it .....
__________________
Frank
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 01-26-2012, 01:35 AM
Steve C. Sink's Avatar
Steve C. Sink Steve C. Sink is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,360
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Daignault View Post
Surfcasting its really tough to use a whole big bait. Who is going to cast a four pound shad? But in boats I have seen three to five pound pollock, shad, mackerel or bunker live lined over the side to catch moby stripers. The logistics in shore fishing just don't lend themselves to that kind of big bait fishing. Eels are it .....
You are right FRANK----but there were a few times that I've been fishing a cut with a strong out flow, pulling everything hard and fast, when I probably should'a put on a whole 'possum.

MULE.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 01-26-2012, 09:55 AM
Chris Garrity Chris Garrity is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 2,148
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Daignault View Post
Surfcasting its really tough to use a whole big bait. Who is going to cast a four pound shad? But in boats I have seen three to five pound pollock, shad, mackerel or bunker live lined over the side to catch moby stripers. The logistics in shore fishing just don't lend themselves to that kind of big bait fishing. Eels are it .....
I've never had a chance to try it, mostly because it's a daytime thing (you need to see), but there is one method of live-lining fish in the surf that I've always wanted to do. It is for when schools of bunker are thick, and close to the beach. I've cut and pasted this from an email I sent a guy last year; feel free to ignore and/or delete it if it's too long (we're not bein' paid by the word, remember). Here goes:


You start -- and no, I haven't been drinking -- by taking a heavy, long bait rod, and casting a heavy weight on the order of 8, 10, or even 12 ounces. That's all you cast: just the weight. Once you've cast your lead, put the rod in the tallest sand spike you can find. You want this much weight in your sinker because once you cast it, you want to make sure it stays put - moving baits are usually preferable, but for this application, you want your sinker to dig into the sand and stay put.

Then you take the second rod you've brought to the beach with you, and this one has a weighted treble hook on its business end. You use this to snag a pogie. Bring the impaled bunker all the way to the beach.

Take a large (I like 10/0) circle hook, and put the bunker on it. I like in the mouth and through the top of the head, leaving the point and barb of the hook exposed, but other methods, like through the back, work well too.

Your big circle hook should be snelled to an 18-24 inch length of heavy (at least 50 lb.) leader material. On the other end of the leader, tie a heavy snap.

Now for the fun part: you take the clip, and you put it on the line on the spiked rod, the one with the bare weight out there. You take the rod out of the spike, and hold it as high above your head as you can. This is why you need a long rod; a 12-or 13-footer, when held as high as you can get it, will create enough of a downward angle to allow gravity to carry your hapless pogie into the surf.

Once you've done this, your work is pretty much done. You can either hold the rod with the nervous bunker on the other end, waiting for an explosive strike, or you can go to work with the snagging rod, working on getting another livie onto the sand.

When a big striper inhales your bait and heads hellbent west, the snap that is attached to the line will bump up against the sinker, your line will come taut, and the game is on.

This setup, which I first learned about in one of Milt Rosko's books
[Sorry, Frank!], is called the Breeches Buoy Rig, and it offers several advantages over other methods of live-lining bunker. The first is casting: it's hard to cast a big, live bunker very far at all; with this setup, you can fling an 8-ounce pyramid sinker halfway to Portugal, and then let gravity get the pogie out there. Another benefit of this kind of setup is that it allows you to actively fish more when the bunker get in casting range: snag a bunker, throw it out there on the Breeches Buoy Rig, and then go back to the snagging rod to try some snag-and-drop action.

Plus, it lets you look like kind of an oddball on the beach. Getting those "What the hell is THAT guy doing" looks is always something that I've enjoyed.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 01-26-2012, 10:24 AM
akoller's Avatar
akoller akoller is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 2,318
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

Nothing gets the stripers going crazy more than a live baitfish. There's a place I used to liveline hickory shad that seems dead until 20 lb stripers start coming out of the woodwork when they see/feel that fish struggling on the surface.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 01-26-2012, 11:46 AM
Nifty Nifty is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: MA
Posts: 812
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

For me livelining is not the problem. My gear has cast big herring, hickories and especially scup from docks, bridges and even the sand if it's a deep beach. The real problem I have is transport. A boatman has his livewell. I need to rely on baitfish being there and catchable. Herring are illegal now and hickories are disappearing faster than twinkies in Oprah's fridge. The one bait that is still ubiquitous is scup, legal size, of course.

Perhaps the best livelining a surfman can do is to foul hook a pogie! With conventional tackle you can use a 10/0 snag hook and rather than bring the pogie in and re-hook it just let it sit out there and sink. The bigger snag hook slows it down faster and once it starts going down, look out.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01-27-2012, 09:38 AM
Steve C. Sink's Avatar
Steve C. Sink Steve C. Sink is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,360
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

CHRIS----DOUBLE ROD-----GOOD POST.----We've seen that done on piers, but I never thought to use it in the surf, and I don't see why I could not make it work with large-large cut bait with any long shore current running, which is usually the case at Hatteras.
Like the gentleman above, I've got rods strong enough to throw extra large baits, and an old heirloom thumb that is still strong enough to keep the spool from slipping on the cast with the extra weight, but with your method, the distance could be increased X 2 or X 3.
My problem is living too damn far away from Hatteras to have the time to be able to be creative or to experiment with some things that I would like to try----so same ole stuff when I get there----but I'm goin' take the time on the N or S beaches to at least get the feel of that double rod technique.
Thanks for the good post, CHRIS.

MULE.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 01-27-2012, 10:11 AM
Chris Garrity Chris Garrity is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 2,148
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

Again, I've never tried it, Mule, but one of the things I like about it is that if you're using a live bait like a menhaden or a croaker, the bait will swim itself out as far as your sinker will let it. Once the fish hits the water, evidently, the fish will swim west as far as your rig will let it, unless there are fishing chasing it to the shoreline (in which case, it's game on). It can be an effective way of fishing a bait that is too large to be cast.

The name, by the way, comes from the way that people used to be rescued after a shipwreck. A breeches buoy is a line that runs from a ship to the shoreline, with an inner-tube like live preserver attached. The person gets in the inner tube, and a rope is pulled from the shore, bringing said person to dry land (gravity helps). Someone who learned the breeches buoy technique in the navy realized that the same kind of setup could be used for fishing. It's probably a gargantuan pain to fish this way, but it would be fun to try.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 01-27-2012, 03:28 PM
MAD 6's Avatar
MAD 6 MAD 6 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 909
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

The most popular live bait in my area this past season was spot. The bait shop always had them in but the manager suggested I use clams and eels instead so I went with them instead. This next season I plan on using live Spot, I'll hook up a nice size sinker and then attach the Spot to a big circle hook - I'll swim it out or go out deep enough in my waders, the water didn't start getting too cold to go in until late October anyway.

Speaking of bait, I remember reading that Frank bought a big old used freezer to store his catch in, I'll look for a deal on a small freezer to hold my baits, I can keep it in the garage next to my tackle. I'm planning on getting a cast net when the mullet arrive again and vacu sealing them fresh to use later for cut/dead bait drifting, its not always easy to get bait around here fresh or frozen at times.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 01-29-2012, 09:04 AM
Frank Daignault's Avatar
Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
Writer, Hunter, Surfcaster
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 30,458
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

In our New England waters there is a lot of scup in use as bait. Small ones, the kind the game wordens cite you for having because they are under 10 inches .

The freezer I mentioned in the book was in partnership with Squid Beaumont: I paid the $25 for it and he moved it and placed it under the bait shop which Tom Saunders paid the electricity for. The old freezers were energy hogs and easy to buy. Some bait but mostly we stored small catches for Fulton St shipping before there was enough for a shipment.
__________________
Frank
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 02-02-2017, 04:34 PM
Francis Daignault Francis Daignault is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: MA
Posts: 1,637
Default Re: "Big Bait = Big Fish"

I checked before I put up the recent one and saw no evidence that we had done it before. Still, I had this nagging sense we had gone over this subject back a ways. We had and this is it.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bait Fishing FishingFool42 Ask Frank Daignault 16 11-28-2009 02:28 PM
Who cares about bait? akoller Ask Frank Daignault 10 10-05-2009 06:44 AM
TOO MUCH BAIT.. Fishing Technique? cpnemo58 Fishing - New Jersey 5 09-27-2007 11:24 PM
Eagle Claw Bait Holder Circle Hooks StriperChaser Fishing - New Jersey 0 04-20-2006 11:11 AM
can i use frozen bait fish? ptw Fishing - New Jersey 6 11-09-2003 08:41 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 1998 - 2016 StriperSurf.com, All Rights Reserved