Home
 
     HOME     ARTICLES     Frank DAIGNAULT     TROPHY RIGS     CONTENTS     FAQs     FLY FISHING     OFF ROAD 4 X 4     STRIPED BASS    SURFCASTING
 
Click for Daignault Biography Twenty Years Trophy Striper Striper Surf Striper Hot Spots MID-ATLANTIC Striper Hot Spots - NEW ENGLAND Eastern Tides Fly Fishing the Striper Surf
TWENTY YEARS ON THE CAPE - STRIPER SURF - STRIPER HOT SPOTS - THE TROPHY STRIPER
EASTERN TIDES - FLY FISHING THE STRIPER SURF
Welcome to Frank Daignault's "CASTS" - Center for Advanced Studies of Trophy Stripers.
Please be sure to read the Protocol and then join in!
 
 
Go Back   StriperSurf Forums > Main Forums > Ask Frank Daignault

Ask Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is recognized as an authority on surf fishing for striped bass. He is the author of six books and hundreds of magazine articles. Frank is a member of the Outdoor Writers of America and lectures throughout the Northeast.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-09-2009, 01:47 PM
ALB31 ALB31 is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,475
Default Bass and global warming

Anybody notice any changes with bass seasons now that global warming is upon us?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-09-2009, 03:27 PM
Frank Daignault's Avatar
Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
Writer, Hunter, Surfcaster
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 30,458
Default Re: Bass and global warming

I have to pass on this one. I totally lack any qualification to express even the weakest opinion. I don't see any changes and really feel any changes in striper stocks are a combination of YOY indices and man's encroachment on striper populations.
__________________
Frank
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-09-2009, 04:39 PM
morrow morrow is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: new jersey
Posts: 95
Default Re: Bass and global warming

....my guess would be as long as there migratory pattern dont change going up to the rocks and down to virginia i dont see any influence on global warming......long term maybe i guess in 50 or 100 years we will know..... what do in know
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-09-2009, 05:23 PM
Cap'n Bigass Cap'n Bigass is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Truro, MA
Posts: 1,022
Default Re: Bass and global warming

Yes, you can now catch stripers all winter long on the Cape. Until ice moves in (later and less than used to be) and makes it impossible to fish.....you know it's time to stop casting when your plug lands with a clink instead of a splash.....but the bass are still there.

I haven't figured it out yet.

CL
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-09-2009, 05:39 PM
ALB31 ALB31 is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,475
Default Re: Bass and global warming

The one thing I see is guys start fishing eariler and finish later then ever before, and there are more fisherman then ever before. Any great late or early fishing is a bait thing. Example when there are early bunker they start early when there are tons of herring late fishing is great. But this is the west end of Long island I don't know about other places. These bait conditions could be waking up dormant local bass.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-09-2009, 07:38 PM
akoller's Avatar
akoller akoller is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 2,314
Default Re: Bass and global warming

I think it is tough to say what is causing things. Bass can tolerate temperatures from 50 to 75 degrees so they can live anywhere from NJ to Maine during the summer. Which stretch they inhabit probably has more to do with how many other bass there are competing for food instead of water temperature. For instance, when there are a lot of bass, they will go farther north. And last year they didn't even really come north of the Cape in numbers, as far as my results showed.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-10-2009, 07:32 AM
Frank Daignault's Avatar
Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
Writer, Hunter, Surfcaster
 
Join Date: Sep 1999
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 30,458
Default Re: Bass and global warming

A lot of these things are sheer speculation. Then throw in the agenderized BS factor and I will never be comfortable with some of the stuff we read.
__________________
Frank
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-10-2009, 11:11 AM
ALB31 ALB31 is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,475
Default Re: Bass and global warming

In still can figure why thousands of seals are this far south all summer with global warming going on . Can we expect the polar bear next? I think the global warming thing hasen't affected us.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-10-2009, 12:02 PM
Cap'n Bigass Cap'n Bigass is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Truro, MA
Posts: 1,022
Default Re: Bass and global warming

The reason the seals are further south is that they are protected and their numbers are exploding, so they have to expand their feeding area. Polar bears are in deep doo-doo because of Polar melting and will probably be extinct soon.

The scientists at Stonybrook U. on Long Island are saying that the L.I. Sound lobster population, which is the southernmost lobster population, is suffering from warm water related illnesses.

Maybe the good side is that since southern fish populations grow larger than their northern relatives because of a longer feeding season, the more northern races may eventually produce more biggies.

CL

Last edited by Cap'n Bigass : 01-10-2009 at 12:16 PM. Reason: Slow thought process, advanced dementia
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-10-2009, 01:31 PM
fishinglsister's Avatar
fishinglsister fishinglsister is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Quincy, Massachusetts
Posts: 1,989
Default Re: Bass and global warming

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cap'n Bigass View Post
The reason the seals are further south is that they are protected and their numbers are exploding, so they have to expand their feeding area. Polar bears are in deep doo-doo because of Polar melting and will probably be extinct soon.

The scientists at Stonybrook U. on Long Island are saying that the L.I. Sound lobster population, which is the southernmost lobster population, is suffering from warm water related illnesses.

Maybe the good side is that since southern fish populations grow larger than their northern relatives because of a longer feeding season, the more northern races may eventually produce more biggies.

CL


Perhaps if we rounded up the seals and fed them to the polar bears we can solve two problems at once?.......JC
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-10-2009, 02:54 PM
ALB31 ALB31 is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,475
Default Re: Bass and global warming

This may be true but I heard from my friend in Maine that were no seals there last year and they wondered where they went.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-10-2009, 03:43 PM
fishinglsister's Avatar
fishinglsister fishinglsister is offline
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Quincy, Massachusetts
Posts: 1,989
Default Re: Bass and global warming

Quote:
Originally Posted by ALB31 View Post
This may be true but I heard from my friend in Maine that were no seals there last year and they wondered where they went.

OK ,so we will split them:Half for the bears and half for the Mainiacs!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-10-2009, 04:36 PM
Chris Garrity Chris Garrity is online now
SS/Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 2,137
Default Re: Bass and global warming

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cap'n Bigass View Post
The reason the seals are further south is that they are protected and their numbers are exploding, so they have to expand their feeding area.
Hey Chuck, wanna make a bet?

One of the reasons that polar bears are dying in more numbers is because there are more polar bears than have been in at least the last three hundred years. Their populations have always tended to fluctuate, but since they too were protected in the 1960s, their numbers have exploded likie the seals'. Didja know that the numbers of polar bears lost every year to global-warming related causes is less than the number of polar bears killed by human hunters? Yes, that's right: the polar bear populations are healthy enough that northern peoples are still allowed to hunt them.

I'm still waiting for an honest discussion of global warming. It seems everyone, from Al Gore to T. Boone Pickens, has an agenda. And this includes most scientists; don't forget that funding for science comes almost exclusively from government, and disastrous forecasts lead to more funding. If a scientist is brave enough to suggest, as M.I.T. climatologist Richard Lindzen has done, that perhaps global warming is not the calamity that most suggest, he's shouted down like a heretic at a Spanish Inquisition hearing. It seems that the guys in the white lab coats don't want their checks from Uncle Sam to stop coming.

I don't know anything about this; my guess is that A) the earth has warmed in the past 100 years, and B) human activity has had something to do with it. But how much the second part contributed to the first part I have no idea, and I don't think the scientists know either. But I think that the effects of global warming on things like striped bass fishing have been way overblown.

It'll be interesting to see the fallout if the global warming hype is wrong. Don't think that scientists can't be wrong: Lord Kelvin, a truly great scientist who did such tremendous work that a temperature scale is named after him, stated equivocally in 1895 that "Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." He was proved wrong less than 10 years later. (He also predicted that radio had no future; his ability as a prognosticator makes me feel better about my picks at the track). If, as some climatologists have predicted, we're at the end of a natural 30-year warming cycle, and temperatures are going to begin to cool significantly in the next decade, it's going to be fun watching some of the sky-is-falling crowd trying to get the egg of their faces. I'll be watching from the front row.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-10-2009, 07:53 PM
clambellies clambellies is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: massachusetts
Posts: 788
Default Re: Bass and global warming

Concerning the polar bear's plight, what I've read is that the sea ice that they spend most of the season on hunting has disappeared. It just isn't there any longer. So the bears have lost the hunting strategy that they've adapted to over hundreds of thousands of years. Maybe it's a man made problem, maybe not, too soon to tell, but the seasonal sea ice is gone. It's gone to the point that companies that own large ocean freighters and tankers are now plotting passages across ocean that previously was only open for a month or so a year. The oil industry is exploring up there now. The great northwest passage that early explorers searched for is now a reality.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 01-10-2009, 08:45 PM
LKB3rd LKB3rd is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CT
Posts: 551
Default Re: Bass and global warming

We'll probably have to pay a carbon tax for striper farts as part of our saltwater fishing licenses because of global warming. That's the point of the whole global warming thing if you ask me. More taxes. People bad. Must pay more money to banks.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bass population ALB31 Ask Frank Daignault 70 01-18-2008 02:48 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 1998 - 2016 StriperSurf.com, All Rights Reserved