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Ask Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is recognized as an authority on surf fishing for striped bass. He is the author of six books and hundreds of magazine articles. Frank is a member of the Outdoor Writers of America and lectures throughout the Northeast.

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  #271  
Old 08-23-2011, 06:14 PM
Merlin Merlin is online now
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

Frank- I have the same thing from meat is greasy and stringy to the others saying tastes great. I think it all comes down to what the bear has been eating for the last month or so. Feeding in a corn field for the last month would taste good but feeding in a dumpster would be anyone's nightmare.

Sept 6 starts the bear season well the first half of it in Ma. and from the owner of the feed store some homeowners are having trouble with them.
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  #272  
Old 08-23-2011, 07:12 PM
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Stan Creighton Stan Creighton is offline
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

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Originally Posted by Frank Daignault View Post
I just wonder if black bears are decent eating. Some say they are great but others say they are not.
Frank,

As Merl stated, I imagine their taste depends on what they have been eating. I have had bear before, and it was okay, but I'll stick with venison. If you do try cooking bear, make sure it is well done (think pork.)

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  #273  
Old 08-24-2011, 02:13 PM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

Thanks, guys. I'm not a bear hunter anyway. I guess I am not a subsistance hunter either, but the idea of eating something wild is kind of a payoff. The head thing about all not necessarilly eating bear meat kind of turns me off. Of course if one came after either of us I would napalm the sonofavitch.
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  #274  
Old 08-25-2011, 10:55 AM
Merlin Merlin is online now
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

You can always make jerky with any meat that you take that is not fit for your table. Shoot and with the meat slice into thin slices, soak over night in recipes availabe on line and dry in your home oven, on lowest setting with door ajar. Place contents in zip lock bags and you have snacks for months to come.

Nice event to do on cool fall days when you do not want to turn on the heating system to take the chill out of house and smells great why meat is drying.

Sidebar: The food and drug administration is now recommending the eating of horse. Now you know what that mystery meat you have been eating might be. It is suppose to taste like between venison and beef. Of couse in the USA we have a culture problem with that. Why do I see my old horses here in a new light?
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  #275  
Old 08-25-2011, 01:29 PM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

I remember meat rationing during the war and horse was not rationed. People were raving about horse meat because -- I think -- you didn't have to use your meat coupons for it. Recently there was something in the paper about them selling horses to Canadian farmers for slaughter where it is more accepted.

When you cut your own deer you learn your way around the animal and learn where the nicest cuts are. I'm always looking at horses in a pasture, kind of lusting over the straps that run along the spine. I would have no problem getting a horse ready for the freezer, hence the grill.
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  #276  
Old 08-26-2011, 09:34 PM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

li'l bitty one, 'bout 70# before dressing, down in south carolina, spot 'n' stalk, mebbe a 17 yard shot in the briars, had me going for awhile trying to get in close on the sneak, which added to the chase, clean lung shot that just nicked the heart, ran maybe 15 yards and piled up dead, butchered that afternoon, bbq'd and eaten the next day, mmmmmmmmmm-good!

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  #277  
Old 08-27-2011, 08:55 AM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

Great shot and great photo, Rob. We've been watching "Hogs Gone Wild" on TV and they are saying the things are really taking over. Ribs would have to be awesome. Thanks for putting this up.
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  #278  
Old 08-27-2011, 09:42 AM
Merlin Merlin is online now
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

Anybody that can go out into the bush and shoot a hog with a long bow has my hat off with praise, maybe a bowe.
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  #279  
Old 08-27-2011, 05:21 PM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

I agree Merl. I don't know if it is a long bow or a recurve or if there is a difference. But I would miss the smell of burnt powder. Still, this guy is top shelf. I think he put up a boar he shot last year. Regular contributor.
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  #280  
Old 08-27-2011, 06:47 PM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

Yes Francis that is a long bow made famous, by our childhood hero Robin Hood. A re curve bow which was the next generation of bows, curves in from the handle and then out again (thus recurve) to give the bow more power, in theory.

I am thinking rfd is into old old basic stuff, straight string with no rewrap in the center, silencers on either end but basically momma's yarn weaved between strands and snapped a couple of times to fluff them up. Arrows not clear but suspect they might be feathers but shafts I do not think are wood but what difference does it make still a nice staulk and kill and more power to him.

Looking at the bow I would say it is made by Fred Bear from the late sixties.

Come on rfd: tell me I am dead wrong!
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  #281  
Old 08-28-2011, 10:12 AM
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Yes Francis that is a long bow made famous, by our childhood hero Robin Hood. A re curve bow which was the next generation of bows, curves in from the handle and then out again (thus recurve) to give the bow more power, in theory.

I am thinking rfd is into old old basic stuff, straight string with no rewrap in the center, silencers on either end but basically momma's yarn weaved between strands and snapped a couple of times to fluff them up. Arrows not clear but suspect they might be feathers but shafts I do not think are wood but what difference does it make still a nice staulk and kill and more power to him.

Looking at the bow I would say it is made by Fred Bear from the late sixties.

Come on rfd: tell me I am dead wrong!
i hope this don't git too technical and bore the beejeesus outta ya, but you did ask ...

nope, not a fred bear. 99% of all bear bows from the 50's to today are recurves. i'm strictly into longbows. the modern definition of a "longbow" is any stick bow where the bowstring only touches the bow's limb nocks, and not any other part of the limbs. any other stick bow is a recurve.

longbows basically come in two flavors - american flat longbows (afl) ala howard hill style, or modern reflex/deflex hybrid (r/d) designs. the hybrid r/d's break down to two categories - mild and aggressive. the mild ones make a "D" limb shape when braced, the aggressive ones have some reflex "flip" at the tips, and look more like a recurve (a "recurve" is a stickbow that has a pronounced curve at the limb ends, and the bowstring will touch that curve when braced). the longbow in the pic is a mohawk, a hybrid mild r/d, 54# @ 29" draw, 66" long.

i shoot both afl and hybrid r/d longbows. they're all 66" in length and hold 51-57# at my 29" draw length. the limbs are laminations of heat tempered bamboo and clear or black fiberglass. the risers (handle sections) are cocobolo hardwood. the mohawk longbow above is also a take down that uses a near invisible connexion hinge at the handle - makes for easy airline transport as all of my hunts are flyouts.

i've been making my own endless bowstrings since the late 50's and use modern hmpe (high modulus polyethylene) string fiber ("dyneema") that's very low in stretch and creep. the string silencers i like using are strands of new zealand sheep wool - very waterproof and tough. the string loop ends are served with a soft nylon thread and the center serving (where the arrow goes) is served with hmpe spectra braid 'cause it's tough stuff.

also build my own arrows since the 50's, using either carbon fiber shafts (as in the pic above) or douglas fir wood shafting. the guidance system is feathers - i make my own fletching outta full length turkey or canada goose feathers (found for free around ponds and golf courses). i prefer razor sharp woodsman three blade broadheads 'cause they make big holes and squirt lotsa blood for quicker kills and better blood trails.

i aim "instinctively" - there are no sighting or ranging devices on longbows. as a pitcher throws a baseball, or quarterback launches a pass, or a free throw basketball shot attempted, you never see the missile, just the target.

traditional archery isn't for everyone. the connection to nature and woodsmanship is an integral part of the trad bow hunt because whether you hunt spot-n-stalk or up in the air (treestand) you must get close to the prey - typically under 30 yards and most often under 20 yards. you must know your gear, what it can and can't do, and when to drop the string and when to pass up the shot - ethics is paramount, too. sometimes (actually lots of times) you may come home to an empty freezer but your mind, heart and soul are filled with the exuberance of life and the excitement of the fair chase.

i'd be more than happy to help anyone start their trad archery/bowhunting journey. here is an article i wrote about trad archery/bowhunting tackle that may help ... trad archery for bowhunters
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  #282  
Old 08-28-2011, 06:17 PM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

Very nice post on your passion, I for one learned a lot. Way better then chasing a little white ball around a perfectly good pasture with clubs to put it in a tiny hole only to take it out again instantly.

I had one of those bows as a youth only on a much cheaper level. The bow was not strong enough so I cut a few inches off the top and bottom and widdled a knotch for the string. I hunted the hospital VA grounds about a mile from my homestead and shot a squirrel. Carried the little sucker home and at my few years skinned it and ate it. Go figure 54 years later I am a member up there (it was on a hill). Good memories ! Wax that string was a must!
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  #283  
Old 08-29-2011, 07:11 AM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

really little critters can be tasty on the bbq spit, too. the hogs and javelinas weren't all that cooperative, so i shot a mess of wabbits down in el paso, texas, fives years back. we ate good, that night's suppers. pacific-yew take down longbow (handle is sleeved brass tubing, wrapped in laced leather), wooden arrows and ace broadheads ...

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  #284  
Old 09-01-2011, 06:33 AM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

This is great, Rob. Very enjoyable. I grew up on rabbits with my .410 Stevens break open hammer action. Started at age eleven. We had beagles that knew the ropes.
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  #285  
Old 09-02-2011, 05:47 PM
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Default Re: The Hunting/Shooting Thread

Francis, now that break open muzzle loaders are legal in our state, what do you shoot for a load charge, bullet weight etc and how does it group (MOA)?
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