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Ask Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is recognized as an authority on surf fishing for striped bass. He is the author of six books and hundreds of magazine articles. Frank is a member of the Outdoor Writers of America and lectures throughout the Northeast.

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  #1  
Old 10-24-2017, 10:18 AM
John_P John_P is offline
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Default Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

We've touched on this in the past I think.

As I've traveled from Cap May NJ to Cape Cod, i noticed how a 2 hour car ride can take me to Surfcasters who approach it very differently.

It would seem to be Surfcasters in southern NJ tend to fish lighter gear than they do in Montauk or perhaps Cape Cod. Some of it is due to the structure and weight of what they are throwing, and what they are trying to imitate, but not all.

Northern NJ they used to love live lining menhaden off the jetties. I just never see that on Long Island.

Do you also see regional differences? What might account for it?
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Old 10-24-2017, 04:25 PM
Francis Daignault Francis Daignault is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

I have been watching regional differences all my life. These differences also evolve. Just a few differences among many: Nauset anglers fish sea worms. P-town anglers plug. Long Island guys favor rigged eels.
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Old 11-10-2017, 02:17 PM
Francis Daignault Francis Daignault is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

The Maritimes they fish bottom baits and would not be caught dead with a plug or lure fishing. Also, stripers are a trash fish in the Maritimes.
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Old 11-10-2017, 08:17 PM
SALMONMEISTER SALMONMEISTER is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

Some differences I've seen...but mostly read about...keeping in mind that this is only one man's opinion (and observations)...

You don't hear that much about eels in Maine.

Clams are used more in NY & NJ than in New England

Mackerel are used more than other baits in Maine

Pencil poppers, bottle plugs (casting swimmers?) and big metal lip swimmers take many big fish at Montauk and NJ, and seem to be used more in those areas than New England.
Using a huge plug and teaser, most fish will hit the teaser...in most places.
That being said, MAYBE places like Cape Cod have a higher sandeel/bunker ratio...places like Montauk have plenty of sandeels, but lots of bunker nearby as well...hence the marked success of large lures.
Larger heavier lures are the norm in the CC Canal. Even the sandeel imitations used there may not be huge...but they're heavy.

Bucktails...work...everywhere.

NJ & NY have lots of chunked and live bunker thrown into the surf...don't seem to hear/read of it as much north of there.

I think it's funny that a nickname for striper is "squid hound" and yet I've rarely seen, heard, or even read about using squid for bass bait...anywhere.
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Old 11-11-2017, 08:19 AM
LKB3rd LKB3rd is offline
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

I think YouTube might be blurring these regional differences, because we can now watch 1000 GoPro videos of guys catching all sorts of fish all over the world.
Here in CT, for bait it is generally bunker chunks. And a lot of guys use plugs. Eels are popular too among more dedicated fishermen, noobs stick to bunkers.
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Old 11-11-2017, 10:05 AM
brucelieb brucelieb is offline
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

A minor 2 cents:

The old farmers in Water Mill/ Bridgehampton were using small stuff and landing big fish. 9' rods and they were in love with Mag darters. Small caster masters and those soft fish (storms.)


40 minutes away...The Montauk guys ( those I know) seem to use big rods and throw bigger plugs and bucktails...
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Old 11-12-2017, 01:51 PM
Francis Daignault Francis Daignault is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

Often something gets going and it becomes the thing to do fishing. Some of it is caused by tackle shops promoting something. I know that I, personally, know exactly what I want to use and never pay attention to what is being said.
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Old 11-13-2017, 02:46 PM
Francis Daignault Francis Daignault is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

Nobody on Long Island fly fishes the striper surf. A lot of SW fly fishing in RI but none on Cape Cod.
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Old 11-13-2017, 05:13 PM
John_P John_P is offline
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Francis Daignault View Post
Nobody on Long Island fly fishes the striper surf. A lot of SW fly fishing in RI but none on Cape Cod.
I?m not sure it?s ?nobody? but the population of surf fly fishers is very small
Though the north shore of Long Island had a decent population of regular fly fishermen

Montauk has a few but it really depends if the fish show up in the wash in the fall
If so the number who put down a spinning rod and pick up a fly rod numbers more than a few

What is ironic is that the small boat fly and light tackle guiding business is quite impressive in the fall. Besides the local captains a significant number of guys take their boats up from Jersey or down from CT

The most recent phenomenon is also targeting false albacore which is another thread
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Old 11-13-2017, 05:32 PM
Chris Garrity Chris Garrity is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

During the last ice age, the glaciers made it as far south as New York and North Jersey before the climate warmed, and the ice began retreating.

Sandy beaches take eons to form, and the ice, in melting, scraped/gouged/scoured the beaches north and east of Noo Yawk, which is why, broadly speaking, the beaches north and east of Lawn Guyland are rocky, whereas the beaches from Jersey on south are still flat and sandy: the glaciers never made it as far south as Jersey, and therefore the sandy beaches were left undisturbed.

I've long wondered whether the very real differences in fishing techniques are due entirely to social factors, or whether the geologic factors might actually be at least partly responsible. It it entirely monkey-see, monkey-do? Or has the fishing evolved in these areas based on trial and error, and efficacy?

Put bluntly: is the predominant use of artificials in North Jersey and points north and east because artificials work better there? And is the prevalence of bait-and-wait fishing from Atlantic City south due to social factors, or to the flat, featureless, sandy beaches there?

I freely admit that I do not have the answer to this question. But it's a good one to think about at night, while filleting shorts in the dunes or waiting for one's needlefish to sink.
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Old 11-13-2017, 08:51 PM
Francis Daignault Francis Daignault is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

Chris, your post is profound and I want to wait until I am both sober and rested. for the morning 4:00 A M comes quick. Can't wait to tackle this post.
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Old 11-14-2017, 10:42 AM
John_P John_P is offline
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Garrity View Post
During the last ice age, the glaciers made it as far south as New York and North Jersey before the climate warmed, and the ice began retreating.

Sandy beaches take eons to form, and the ice, in melting, scraped/gouged/scoured the beaches north and east of Noo Yawk, which is why, broadly speaking, the beaches north and east of Lawn Guyland are rocky, whereas the beaches from Jersey on south are still flat and sandy: the glaciers never made it as far south as Jersey, and therefore the sandy beaches were left undisturbed.

I've long wondered whether the very real differences in fishing techniques are due entirely to social factors, or whether the geologic factors might actually be at least partly responsible. It it entirely monkey-see, monkey-do? Or has the fishing evolved in these areas based on trial and error, and efficacy?

Put bluntly: is the predominant use of artificials in North Jersey and points north and east because artificials work better there? And is the prevalence of bait-and-wait fishing from Atlantic City south due to social factors, or to the flat, featureless, sandy beaches there?

I freely admit that I do not have the answer to this question. But it's a good one to think about at night, while filleting shorts in the dunes or waiting for one's needlefish to sink.
In the case of lawn guyland, the Wisconsin glacier most certainly changed the look and fish ability of the place. I don?t think it?s a matter that artificial s work better, but they would seem to work at least a healthy portion of the time. We do have a segment within a segment of anglers who simply do not like fishing bait and would rather swing a golf club than dead stick a rod.

But getting back to the geological view, we are talking about barrier islands and sand bars versus rock points and reefs

Casting darters in the middle of the night over a rip created as the tide rushes over a rock reef sure has its appeal (to me anyway)
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Old 11-14-2017, 11:35 AM
Chris Garrity Chris Garrity is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

Our own Dennis Zambrotta spent last week on Block Island, and he posted a few pictures that had my mouth agape: there is structure there that just doesn't exist anywhere south of Atlantic City.

Take a look at this picture (and Dennis, just say so if you want me to take it down): is there any striperman here whose first reaction to having this in your fore would do anything other than throw a plug in there?

The kind of plug is important, but is also strictly secondary: whether it's a bucktail, a swimmer, a rubber shad or whatever -- the point is that this kind of structure almost impels one to throw an artificial. It would be an odd bird who, seeing this water in front of him, would say, Hey, I think I'm going to cast a bunker head and a 10 ounce sinker!
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Old 11-14-2017, 11:39 AM
Chris Garrity Chris Garrity is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

Now take a look at this picture, which is a stock picture from the interwebs that I stole, of the surf in Wildwood, NJ. Plugs will work here, but the lack of structure makes throwing artificials less of a no-brainer, right?

If gamefish are structure oriented -- and anyone who's read the Mister Smarty oeuvre knows that they are -- then what does the earnest angler do when faced with such a lack of structure? Throw artificials? Or throw bait and try to attract the fish to you?
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Old 11-14-2017, 11:41 AM
Chris Garrity Chris Garrity is online now
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Default Re: Regional Differences in Surfcasting for Stripers?

And for the record, I am not saying that this is the case -- I know enough to admit that on this question, I do not know the answer. I'm just saying, or maybe suggesting, that the plugs-north/bait-south dichotomy along the Striper Coast might -- might -- have evolved for more than just social reasons. Maybe the bait-and-wait approach along the southern end of the striper's range is because that works better, most of the time, along the flat and featureless beaches they got down there.
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